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How to position your bike to change the light

May 4th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Commuting | Tags:

I found some slides for different types of stop light detectors and those that are paved over. In general, one needs to have their wheel and/or bottom bracket over the cut in the pavement for best detection.

If the stop light doesn’t change within 90 seconds, the detector is deficient and a person biking may go through the intersection when they will not interfere with a person driving a vehicle on the cross street. In other words, treat the stop light as a two-way stop sign with the cross street having the right-of-way.

Note: A police officer seeing you ‘run’ the red light may still issue a ticket. You would need to contact the county clerk to dismiss the ticket, or go before a judge to dismiss the ticket.

California Association of BicycleOrganizations

California Association of BicycleOrganizations

DualChase.com

DualChase.com

DualChase.com

DualChase.com

Complete Streets Policy needs feedback by Friday, May 1

April 28th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Advocacy | Tags: , , ,

Please take five minutes to read through the two page Complete Streets Policy draft.

Please contact info@omahabydesign.org with any suggestions.

I have included my suggestions below. If you agree with any, please write in your own words and send them to the email above.

Thank you,
Dale Rabideau

Dear Sir:

I have the following suggestions for improving the Complete Streets Policy:

A.6. Complete Streets requires appropriate performance measures.
A.6.2 Linear miles of new/restriped on-street bicycle facilities

First, I suggest the need to measure new/repaired street furniture such as bollards, planters, curbs, directional signage, etc. for protected on-street bike lanes.
Bike facilities consist of more than putting down painted lines and sharrows on streets.

Second, expanding the Omaha Area Metro Trail System should be included in complete streets because these act as “streets” for people who walk or ride bike. We don’t segregate funding for roads based on why a person is driving their car on them. Likewise, the Metro Trail System should not be conceptualized as just a recreational trail but as a non-motorized ‘street’. As such, the City, County, and State should contribute a percentage from the transportation budget to this non motorized street system.

A.1. Complete Streets serve all users and modes.
The City shall develop the community’s streets and right-of-way …

Since the OAMTS is a public right-of-way, it should be considered with motorized streets for the movement of people from one place to another. For non motorized transport, the Metro Trail System should be conceived of as the backbone or ‘limited access’ highway for people who move by walking or biking.

Think about how many people like to live on a connection to a ‘limited access’ motor highway for commuting. The OAMTS can reach along creeks and railroad lines to Benson, Cunningham Lake, Bennington, Valley, Elkhorn, Gretna, Springfield, Ralston, La Vista, Papillion, South Omaha.
See this map on OAMTS gaps:
Omaha Area Meto Trail System gaps

Taking our cue from nature where tributaries add to the major Papillion Watershed creeks; where possible, these tributaries should have non motorized streets to reach out via the lowest grade available into the surrounding bluffs and hills. This is how people traveled on foot and horse back before mechanized transportation vehicles removed the need to base routes on the horses’ or person’s energy output needed to change elevation.

C. Exceptions
I suggest a member from the Mayor’s Active Living Advisory Committee should be included with Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, Director of Parks in order to write up an Exception to this Policy. Reasons for this suggestion: 1) There needs to be input from a person who moves around the city by walking or riding a bike in order to see how the exception would affect non motorized users. 2) Having such a non motorized advocate would provide cover from public discontent over any exception.

Thank you for considering these suggestion.
Thank you for the many hours of work already put into the policy draft.

Sincerely,
Dale Rabideau
Omaha Bikes

Earth Day Omaha 2015 – Bike Corral and Bike Dust Off

April 13th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Uncategorized

Saturday, April 25 in Elmwood Park

Bike Corral pre-build

Bike Corral pre-build

2014 bike corral

2014 bike corral

Omaha Bikes is providing free parking for bikes and a mechanic station for those who want a bike safety check over. We can make minor adjustments to brakes and shifting, and will have some tubes to fix flat tires.

Please use the corral to park your bike and walk around the different tents and enjoy the stage speakers and performers. Car parking will be very difficult, rather drive to a parking area along the Keystone Trail and ride your bike to Pacific St and then east to Elmwood Park entrance. Bicycle path is available the entire way.

We need volunteers to help: There are two hour slots for valet parking – we tie ticket to bike and give ticket to person; and two hour slots for bike check overs.

Please click here to register to help.

For more info on Earth Day Omaha – click here.

South Omaha Trail – March Update

March 17th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Trails | Tags:

Here is an overview of the South Omaha Trail construction zone. The pictures start in the upper right corner and focus on the 90+ degree turn just south of I-80, with the last handful being just west of 42nd St.

bike route map snip

Current end of the Field Club Trail at Vinton St. Looking South along the West side of the elevator.
mar vinton st

The original elevator building for loading and unloading grain. If you look closely, the white painted silos are a slightly smaller diameter than the additions to the North and South.
mar elevator

The I-80 bridge.
mar I80 bridge

mar I80 bridge 2

mar I80 bridge 3

mar pic 1

Looking SouthWest.
mar pic 2

Parked car on top of I-80 bridge to get this SouthWest shot from above.
mar I80

Contrasted above pic with this one to get a good idea how big an area this turn will encompass.
mar pic 03

This is the blueprints for this turn. Notice how the trail winds around in order to check/slow one’s speed and provide a longer climb.

Zone I

Zone I

mar pic 04

mar pic 05

Looking towards South and culvert under RR tracks.
mar pic 06

1906 – this culvert has almost silted shut from I-80 construction and expansion over the years.
mar pic 08

Looking North – a 108′ long, 30″ culvert will a path under the trail for water from along I-80 to the RR culvert. The trail will be about 18′ above the culvert. The bank drop off will be 1′ down for every 3′ away from the trail.
mar pic 07

mar pic 09

mar pic 10

From the top looking East.
mar pic 11

mar pic 12

mar pic 14

Putting up black construction barriers to catch dirt, etc. Trail will be along right barrier.
mar pic 13

36th and D Sts looking West. All trees and stumps are removed.
mar pic 15

D St looking East to 36th St.
mar pic 16

Looking West at 42nd St bridge. Standing approximately where trail will come off side of bank.
mar pic 17

Trail will be 18′ above RR track under the bridge, which is approximately 6′ above the side support between the pillars.
mar pic 18

Just West of 42nd St bridge.
mar pic 19

Clearing trees and stumps before filling in trail corridor with dirt.
mar pic 20

mar pic 21

mar pic 22

Notice the old telephone pole at an angle.
mar pic 23

Another pole. I like pieces that provide historical note.
mar pic 24

South Omaha Trail Overview

February 25th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Trails | Tags:

The final 1.5 miles connecting the South Omaha Trail to the Field Club Trail is scheduled to be completed by February 2016, though with good weather, December 2015 is a likely opening date. The initial phase from Karen Park and the Keystone Trail to 45th St and G St was completed a couple years ago. Unfortunately, the City of Omaha never budgeted for completing this crucial link between the Keystone Trail and Midtown/Downtown Omaha. Fortunately, we can thank the Papio-Missouri NRD and District 6 Jim Thompson for stepping up to the plate and providing $5M of the people’s money to complete this multi-user infrastructure for human powered movement.

A snip from the Omaha Bikes Bike Route Map reveals the extent of the trail under construction in orange.

snip from Omaha Bikes Bike Route Map

Omaha Bikes Bike Route Map

The blue prints have broken the construction into 10 zones labeled A-J.

blue print overview

blue print overview

Current East terminus at 45th and G St.

Current East terminus

Current East terminus

Zone A
The trail up to the F St bridge is approximately Zone A. Though little grade work needs to be done, ‘A’ will be the last zone to be completed before opening the trail. The zones will be worked on independent from one another. In other words, the trail will not be constructed from zone A-J in a linear fashion.

Zone A

Zone A

Zone A

Zone A

Zone B
Zone B has a steep embankment on the South-East side of the trail.

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

The previous picture is looking down about a 30′ drop to the bottom. The dashed line in the blue print below is current grade, the solid black line is final trail grade. Approximately 15′ of dirt from where I was standing in the previous picture will be pushed into the low area to bring that up to final grade, in addition to many cubic yards of dirt. The final grade up and down this zone is about 5%.

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone B

Zone C
Now we are in Zone C and near the 42nd St overpass. There will be a retaining wall and fence on both sides of the trail where it parallels the railroad track.

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone C

Zone D
This is where the trail will come on the former storage area. A parking lot trailhead will have room for 6-7 cars.

Zone D

Zone D

Zone D

Zone D

Zone D

Zone D

At this point, the trail crosses to the South side of D St. This is the entrance to a concrete recycling plant. Large trucks on to and off of D St. There are good sight lines. The trucks slow down to turn in and stop before pulling out. The trail will have a stop sign and trail traffic will yield to D St traffic.

Zone D

Zone D

Zone E

Zone E

Zone E

D St’s south curb will be move north 5′. The trail will narrow from 10′ to 8′ along D St so property owner’s will loose no property. A wooden fence will separate the trail from property owners to the south.

Zone E

Zone E

Zone E

Zone E

Zone E

Zone E

Zone F
At this point, we enter zone F where the trail returns to 10′ wide, a retaining wall with fence will be constructed on the south side at the beginning and end, while dirt will be brought in for a 1 to 3 shoulder grade to the north.

Zone F

Zone F

Zone F

Zone F

This is the middle section at the end of 36th Ave where there will be no retaining wall.

Zone F

Zone F

The next two pictures show the general area for the 90 degree turn along side 36th St.

Zone F

Zone F

Zone F

Zone F

Zone G
Going north along 36th St.

Zone G

Zone G

Zone G

Zone G

At this point, the trail will narrow to 4′ and use the sidewalk on the bridge. The rules will state that people must dismount and walk bike by one another. Very precise driving between two people biking could pass. The choice I will consider is to check traffic on 36th St prior to the parking sign and then jump into the northbound lane before the water basin and view of south bound traffic is restricted.

Zone G

Zone G

Zone G

Zone G

Concrete recycle plant to the west. At this point, one will really notice the noise from the plant and I-80 from here to the grain elevator.

Zone G

Zone G

The trail will have stop signs for trail users before crossing 36th St. One must check traffic carefully. I believe the speed limit is 35 mph but cars going north down the hill onto the bridge and over tend to be going faster and are slightly hidden because the bridge bows up in the middle and hides cars farther south. This is another reason to have jumped onto the north going lane before the bridge. You have possession of the lane and can signal slowing and right turn at the trail crossing.

Zone G

Zone G

Zone H
Zone H has the steepest grade of any zone – 9% down to the flat. The trail will have fence on both sides through this zone, probably something like the section at the west end of the South Omaha Trail going around the Kiewit construction lot.

Zone H

Zone H

Zone H

Zone H

The construction right of way is between the tires of the trailer left to the end of the fence. I took a poor picture of the blue prints above so I am guessing the the trail will be along the I-80 side.

Zone H

Zone H

Zone H

Zone H

Zone I
I did not study the blue prints before shooting the pictures. As you notice, zone I has the trail going south before heading north under the bridge. All my pictures going down to the tracks will be left of the trail.

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Notice on the grade lines, about 18 feet of dirt is being brought in so a continual 5% grade will take one down to the underpass.

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone I

Zone J
Zone J goes from the underpass, along the grain elevators to Vinton St and the current south terminus of the Field Club Trail. I would guess that the underpass will be where the trail changes names.

Zone J

Zone J

Zone I

Zone I

And a final look south through the underpass. Maybe you can make out the work of aspiring artists in the area.

It is difficult to overstate the importance of the South Omaha Trail connection from the Keystone Trial to the Field Club Trail. There are only three at-grade street crossings – 60th St with the Hawk light, D St, and 36th St. For those who want to get downtown with the least interaction with motor vehicles and the least hill climbing, the South Omaha Trail will be our best option!

The Lives of People Riding Bikes are Worth More Than Less Congestion

February 11th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Advocacy | Tags:

Though traffic laws may be instituted to guide safe practices, often times they have to balance safer driving practices with maximizing throughput. The following two examples of a police officer and construction worker match closely with the vulnerability of people biking.

When police officers are standing at drivers’ windows on the side of the road, is it acceptable to pass only three feet away from them at 20, 30, 40 mph?
police stop from i.huffpost.com

When passing a temporary road construction zone with no cement barricade, is it acceptable to pass only three feet away from the person working at 20, 30, 40 mph?
road construction in usa.streetsblog.org

When a person is hit at 40 mph, the likelihood of death is over 80%. When the person is driving 20 mph, the death rate of the person standing, walking, or biking, drops under 5%.

Both the police officer and construction worker outside their vehicle require people driving to slow down resulting in possible congestion. Are the lives of these people on the street considered worthy of causing congestion whereas a person biking is not?

The current law requiring people driving to create at least three feet between their vehicle and the person biking is not about safety, because as we understand with the police officer and construction worker, three feet isn’t considered safe at a 20+mph speed differential.
3 feet azusa police from la.streetsblog.org

The three foot law is unenforceable because, unlike having to move across a stripe marking the next lane which LB 39 would require, the police officer has to estimate three feet, often from hundreds of feet away. The practical result: the three foot law is only enforced after the fact by writing a ticket or upgrading the charge to involuntary vehicular manslaughter when a person biking has been hit or killed.

Similar in size and exposure to people biking, people driving motorcycles are taught to ride near the center of the lane in order to be seen by on-coming traffic and people driving across or turning onto the street. The current ‘far to the right’ law requiring people biking to ride near the gutter, white line, or within the door zone of parked cars puts us in the worst location for safety and taking evasive action in the traffic lane.

passing motorcycle from silviastuurman.nl
People driving cars are required to pull completely into the next lane when passing a person driving a motorcycle; and that is with a speed differential of only 5-10 mph. Why should it be any less for passing people biking, especially when the speed differential is 20-40+ mph?

20150123_094436_resized

LB 39 would standardize passing protocol regardless of the type of vehicle by requiring people driving to move into the next lane of a striped road when passing. LB 39 would also standardize the safety margin for vulnerable people on the road and provide an enforceable law before the fact of injury or death.

Please write or call your Senator and the Senators on the Transportation & Telecommunications Committee and implore them to reconsider LB 39 and bring it to the full senate:

Senator Jim Smith – Chairman – Omaha jsmith@leg.ne.gov
Senator Lydia Brasch -Vice Chair – West Point lbrasch@leg.ne.gov
Senator Al Davis – Hyannis adavis@leg.ne.gov
Senator Tommy Garrett – Bellevue tgarrett@leg.ne.gov
Senator Beau McCoy – Omaha bmccoy@leg.ne.gov
Senator John Murante – Gretna jmurante@leg.ne.gov
Senator Les Seiler – Hastings lseiler@leg.ne.gov

Dale Rabideau
OmahaBikes.org

20150123_094500_resized

LB 38 – vulnerable road users

January 26th, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Advocacy | Tags:

ghost bike
Ghost bike for Jim Johnston – 260th and West Center Road

The hearing date for LB 38 is: Wedensday, January 28 at 1:30 in Room 1113 in the Judiciary Committee.

Write to the Chairman of the Committee, Sen. Les Seiler at lseiler@leg.ne.gov.

Tell the senator why you support the legislation and that you want your email to be part of the record. You need to give your name and address or it will likely get tossed.

http://www.nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/104/PDF/Intro/LB38.pdf

Looking at LB 38, besides defining a vulnerable road user, the increase in penality when caused by careless driving is a Class IV felony, instead of a Class I misdemeanor, and up to 200 hours community service.

While an improvement over the current law, driver education and more enhanced penalties should to be addressed in LB 38:

  1. There should be a requirement for remedial driving instruction on the rights and space of vulnerable road users, and testing in a vehicle driving around vulnerable road users.
  2. The current 6 month minimum license supension for causing the death of a pedestrian is a slap in the face to the family of the victim, and says that the privelidge of driving a motor vehicle is held almost as high as life itself. The minimum license suspension should be increased to three years. The maximum should be changed from 15 years to life without driving.
  3. The suspended license period should not start until the perpetrator is out of jail if they served jail time. The perpetrator needs to experience the entire suspended license period outside of jail without the priveledge of driving a car.

Here is an article on Florida’s proposed vulnerable road users’ law and additional issues they addressed:
http://www.news-press.com/story/news/2015/01/22/birth-bill-protect-cyclists-walkers/22185687/

Dale Rabideau

LB 39 – How To Make It Great.

January 23rd, 2015 | Author: Dale Rabideau
Category: Advocacy, Commuting | Tags:

Which position in the lane do you prefer to drive from?

20150123_094422_resized 20150123_094436_resized 20150123_094500_resized

Only the first picture is currently legal under Nebraska law.

Senator Rick Kolowski introduced Nebraska LB 39 which is a great improvement over the current law. The main aspect of LB 39 is to require motor vehicles to pull completely into the next lane when passing a bike rider on a multi lane road. For any one who drives a bicycle on a divided road knows, it is always a pleasure and sign of respect when a motor vehicle pulls completely into another lane to pass.

While I highly encourage the passing of LB 39, there are two other subsections that need to be amended in order to provide cyclist with more visibility and a better position in the lane.

First, 60-6,317 (1)* requires bicyclists to drive as near the right hand curb or edge of the roadway as practicable (brought to fruition with any unreasonable demands (thelawdictionar.org)).

This ‘far to the right’ (FTR) requirement creates several safety issues.

  • Riding to the right keeps a bicyclist hidden longer from those looking to cross or turn onto the lane from the rider’s right.
  • When cars are parked along the right, FTR requires cyclists to ride in the door zone.
  • Many vehicle designs and window tinting don’t allow one to see the driver’s position from behind so one can not anticipate moving out of the door’s reach when the driver is exiting the vehicle.
  • Motorcycles are taught to ride in the middle to left side of the lane in order to be better noticed by other motorists and alleviate dooring. That best practice applies to bicycles also.
  • The right or left tire track are usually the cleanest part of the lane and give more maneuverability for surface irregularities, and more options to respond to traffic situations than FTR.

Though some may argue that FTR allows exceptions to consider for safety issues, I see many riders hugging the white line through thick or thin. It seems they don’t know about the exceptions to FTR, or they believe FTR is the safest place to be regardless because that is the primary lawful lane position. Bicycle drivers need to continually examine their complete lane environment and traffic situation in order to choose the best location in the lane. Give bicycles drivers the whole lane, just like any two or four wheel motor vehicle driver. This equality will make us more thoughtful, and responsible, drivers of bicycles.

For the safest operation of one’s bicycle on the street, bicyclists should control their place in the lane as taught by the American Bicycling Education Association, Inc. Please see http://cyclingsavvy.org/2010/06/you-lead-the-dance/ for a short explanation and five minute video demonstrating the practice.

Thus, to improve the visibility, safety, and operation of the bicycle, I request the removal of the 60-6,317 (1) requirement to ride as near the right hand curb or edge of the roadway as practicable in LB 39.

Second, 60-6,317 (2)** requires multiple bicyclists to follow in single file.

Since LB 39 requires vehicles move fully into the next lane to pass, coupled with the proposed removal of FTR, bicycle drivers should have the option of riding double file (one row of bikes in each tire track).

  • This would increase our visibility to both overtaking and oncoming traffic, and thereby increase our safety since visibility is the primary excuse used by motorists when they hit a cyclist.
  • The second row of bicyclists would not be taking any more lane space than a single row would be entitled to with no FTR.
  • Riding double file will halve the length of a larger group so that vehicles wanting to pass would be able to do so more quickly.
  • Finally, riding side by side allows bicyclists to talk with one another more easily, increasing the enjoyment of the ride.

Thus, I ask that 60-6,317 (2) be written to allow double file riding in the drive lane, not just on the shoulder of the road.

Removing the FTR and single file requirements will greatly improve the visibility, safety, and operation of the bicycle. These amendments follow naturally and logically from requiring passing vehicles to move completely into the next lane. Taken as a whole, they would produce the best driving options and expectations for bicyclists and motor vehicles by treating both by the same rules. Drivers of bicycles must comply with all the same rules as motor vehicles. Thus we should be treated as a slow moving motor vehicle owning, and being allowed anywhere in, the whole lane.

Dale Rabideau

* http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/104/PDF/Intro/LB39.pdf - page 4, line 8

** page 5, line 1

P.S.
If you agree, please write in your own words/experience the following Senators and urge them to amend the two sections and pass LB 39 to the full senate:

Sen. Rick Kolowski –introduced LB 39 – rkolowski@leg.ne.gov

Transportation & Telecommunications Committee
Sen. Jim Smith – Chairman – Omaha jsmith@leg.ne.gov
Sen. Lydia Brasch – Vice Chair – West Point lbrasch@leg.ne.gov
Sen. Al Davis – Hyannis adavis@leg.ne.gov
Sen. Tommy Garrett – Bellevue tgarrett@leg.ne.gov
Sen. Beau McCoy – Omaha bmccoy@leg.ne.gov
Sen. John Murante – Gretna jmurante@leg.ne.gov
Sen. Les Seiler – Hastings lseiler@leg.ne.gov

 

2014 Bike De’Lights

December 14th, 2014 | Author: OmahaBikes
Category: Rides

What a great turnout on a beautiful night!  We estimate that over 75 riders came to see the holiday lights in Midtown Omaha.

Please take a moment to complete our survey about the event!

10733999_743802422370550_1023108224328090170_n

Thank you Mayor Stothert!

December 5th, 2014 | Author: admin
Category: Advocacy
We at Omaha Bikes want to thank Mayor Jean Stothert for her selections of a qualified, talented, and well-rounded group of volunteer members to ALAC. We look forward to seeing the results that this group is able to achieve when working together.

We encourage all friends of Omaha Bikes to reach out and thank the Mayor and her staff for this critical step in the process of making Omaha a better and safer place to live, work, and ride bikes.

You can thank the Mayor in any of the following ways:
(see below for suggested Thank You notes!)

Suggested Email: Dear Mayor Stothert:
Thank you for selecting a qualified, talented, and well-rounded group of volunteer members to serve the ALAC. I look forward to what you will acheive together.
[YOUR NAME]
[YOUR PLACE OF RESIDENCE]

Suggested Facebook Post: Thank you @Jean.Stothert for selecting a qualified, talented, and well-rounded group of volunteer members to serve the ALAC. I look forward to what you will acheive together.

Suggested Tweet: Thank you @Jean_Stothert for selecting a qualified, talented, and well-rounded group of volunteer members to serve the ALAC.

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